The sound of the dialup, pictured

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If you ever connected to the Internet before the 2000s, you probably remember that it made a peculiar sound. But despite becoming so familiar, it remained a mystery for most of us. What do these sounds mean?

 

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Self-Censoring Font Redacts Words the Feds Are Watching For

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Seen, a downloadable font from designer Emil Kozole, brilliantly illustrates these linguistic triggers by redacting these so-called spook words. Type something as innocent as “facility” or “San Diego” and before your cursor even jumps a space ahead, the word is hidden behind a black strike-through. It’s disturbing, frustrating, and alarming, and that’s the point.

 

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Publicly Shaming the US’s Top Surveillance Officials with Street Art

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Titled Overexposed, the series relies on open-source intelligence “to satirize both an era of ubiquitous mass surveillance and overly mediated political personas,” as the project site explains. Using photographs of top officials he finds on social media as his source material, Cirio then creates large stencils of their faces, closely cropped, and either spray paints the portraits or plasters poster equivalents on public walls. During the year he has worked on the project, he has pasted hundreds of these images throughout street art-saturated neighborhoods such as Shoreditch and Hackney in London, New York’s Lower East Side, East Berlin, and Belleville in Paris.

 

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You Probably Can’t Jailbreak This Tablet Made For America’s Prisoners

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Private corrections service JPay introduced the JP5mini tablet last week, a tablet made specifically for the nearly two million incarcerated Americans that the company services in correctional facilities across 34 states.

 

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Surveillance cameras hanging out together

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Have you ever noticed how surveillance cameras are always alone? There’s a good reason for that. Prague-based artist Jakub Geltner shows us how disturbing it can get if these devices hung out together, just like a flock or a herd.

Wanting to show how technology has saturated the world around us, he’s been placing security cameras and satellite dishes in groups around public places. According to Geltner, these systems that are continually populating public sites are an infection, littering our landscapes with their ever-watchful eyes.

 

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The Violence of Algorithms

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Why Big Data Is Only as Smart as Those Who Generate It

 

 

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The long life of a quick "fix"

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“Short-term solutions tend to stay with us for a very long time. And long-term solutions tend to never happen,” said Yakov Rekhter, one of the engineers who invented the “three-napkins protocol.” “That’s what I learned from this experience.”

“You’re in Hackerville here on the Internet. Period,” said Randy Bush, a computer scientist who specializes in routing security. “All of this stuff lacks formal discipline. . . . It’s paint and spackle.”

 

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We Are Always Listening

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Eavesdropping on the population has revealed many saying “I’m not doing anything wrong so who cares if the NSA tracks what I say and do?” 
Citizens don’t seem to mind this monitoring, so we’re hiding recorders in public places in hopes of gathering information to help win the war on terror. We've started with NYC as a pilot program, but hope to roll the initiative out all across The Homeland.
 For greater transparency we're declassifying excerpts from the recordings and highlighting where some devices are located.

 

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Heating buildings using computers

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A "digital heater" is essentially a bank of computers designed so that the heat they generate is channelled around a room or building that needs heating.

 

A Dutch startup called Nerdalize is marketing a radiator that uses heat generated from a computer server to warm up homes.